SaaS Websites: Is shorter copy really better?

Inside:

3 CRO-killing trends to avoid in your SaaS web copy
What was REALLY going on in the NNG study that suggested people don’t read online
5 factors for winning SaaS website copy
Yes, sometimes short copy is better than long copy
3 actions to improve your web copy performance

“It’s too long.”
Web copywriters get this feedback all the time.
But I suspect SaaS copywriters hear it most.
Because in the world of SaaS websites, short copy reigns supreme.
For example:

And:

Oh and this:

If you search long enough, you’ll find the rare SaaS website that uses somewhat longer

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How to write a landing page for problem-aware visitors

All the optimizing in the world can’t fix a landing page that doesn’t match your visitor’s expectations.

With the rising cost of PPC campaigns and the mad competition of organic search, the wrong messaging (especially at the top of the funnel) will lead to higher bounce rates than Ice Cube in the 90s. 

God that’s a solid reference. Anyway…

Landing pages should never be a one-size-fits-all experience.

Presenting the same message to everyone —  cold traffic, warm traffic, email subscribers,  long-time customers — is a good way to come across as tone-deaf.

And

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How a Unique Selling Proposition for Our Content Marketing Doubled Revenue

They say it takes 6-12 months for content marketing and SEO to “start working.”

Does that seem like a long time for you? It does to me…

John Bonini and his team at Litmus took six months before his traffic started to climb:

Marcus Sheridan was blogging on RiverPoolsandSpas.com and saw a traffic increase in six months. 

And that was by posting 2-3 times a week back in the SEO glory-days of years gone bye.

AND he was spending a crap-ton of money on PPC. 

(Do not confuse this with a metric ton. Or

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Speaking the Language of Coronavirus: An analysis of the words and phrases that spread viral content

Between March 10 and April 23 there was an approximately 1478% increase in engagement with coronavirus-related content:

So – aside from the obvious – why are we obsessively consuming this content?
Why, when your area may not even have cases of coronavirus yet, do you find yourself reading and thinking about it constantly?
And can we – as marketers – reverse-engineer this mass viral content outbreak to better understand how information spreads?
Here are three key insights that doing this can teach us:
1. Understand behavioural psychology as it relates to our current circumstances.
In

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