First Month Free + No Charge Migration to a Faster WordPress Website

It’s been less than three months since we launched StudioPress Sites, our new solution that combines the ease of an all-in-one website builder with the flexible power of WordPress.
The response and feedback have been phenomenal. And the icing on the cake is that we’re already winning accolades.
In an independent speed test performed this month by WebMatros, StudioPress Sites was declared the undisputed winner. We’re thrilled, because we were up against formidable competition from WP Engine, Flywheel, Media Temple, Pressable, and Bluehost.
As you know, speed is important. If a page takes more than a couple of seconds to load, users will instantly hit the back button and move on.
But that’s only part of the story. Because unlike those other hosts, with StudioPress Sites you just sign up and quickly set up, without the usual hassles of self-hosted WordPress.
WordPress made fast and easy
The primary difference between a website builder and self-hosted WordPress is that with the former, you’re dealing with software as a service (SaaS), while the latter is … well, hosting. Not only is self-hosted WordPress a pain to deal with, it can also lead to unexpected surprises if you actually succeed (like your site crashing).
In this sense, StudioPress Sites is more like SaaS than hosting. You can set up your new site in just minutes on our server infrastructure that’s specifically optimized (and now independently tested) for peak WordPress performance.
From there, you simply select from 20 mobile-optimized HTML5 designs. Then, you choose from a

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6 SEO Friendly Tips to Improve Site Speed on WordPress Blogs

In the world of SEO, user experience on websites has always been a factor, as has the time it takes for a site to load.
However, with the use of mobile devices surpassing desktop use (in most consumer-facing industries) and the wide adoption of broadband, people expect sites to load instantly.
Long gone are the days of waiting 10 seconds for a site to load.
If a page takes more than a couple of seconds to load, users will instantly hit the back button and move on to the next result.
Accordingly, Google officially started paying attention to site speed and declared its importance as a factor in rankings.
In order to keep up with Google’s site-ranking measures, WordPress blog users need to know exactly what they can do to improve their own site speed.
Remember when Google rolled out AMP (accelerated mobile pages)?
They now serve up publisher content in a simplified Google hosted experience that renders superfast. I like AMP from a user perspective because I know that AMP content will load incredibly fast on my mobile device, but as a publisher:
I’d rather speed up my blog and attract traffic directly to my site than have users stay on Google.
If you use StudioPress Sites or the Rainmaker Platform, your site will already load quickly. However, adding ad scripts, featured images, tracking codes, 301 redirects, etc. will slow down the loading of a site and increase demand on your server/hosting company.
Here are six simple

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7 Easy-to-Forget SEO Steps You Need to Consider Every Time You Publish

“But I don’t really think about SEO very much anymore.”
That was my initial reaction when we all agreed that March would be SEO month here at Copyblogger. At which point, of course, I knew I’d have to write about it.
“Look, I just create useful content for people. Do that, get it read, get it shared, get links, have good hosting and fast page-load times … and productive search engine results will follow, right? I mean, what else is there to say?”
Turns out, plenty.
Keyword research is more fundamental to your content marketing strategy than you may think. Also, you may already be making fatal optimization mistakes. Plus, who knew SEO advice could be so … practical? (Including #8, which will punch you square between the eyes.)
I read those articles, rethought my position, and decided to examine exactly how much I actually think about SEO on a post-by-post basis.
And, turns out, plenty. (Whether or not I realized it.)
It’s easy to forget about the basic steps I’m going to outline below, but they shouldn’t be overlooked. Because the minute I stop doing them is the minute my content starts attracting fewer targeted visitors. Same goes for you.
So let’s start at the top, because the first one is by far the most important of the seven — and it will take me the longest to explain.
(Note: I’m going to use my site AssemblyCall.com as an example throughout this post. It’s built on the Rainmaker Platform, which

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Introducing StudioPress Sites: WordPress Made Easy … Without Sacrificing Power or Flexibility

From 2010 through 2015, we at Rainmaker Digital built at a furious pace. Most of that effort was directed at development of the Rainmaker Platform.
During that entire time, StudioPress.com worked tirelessly in the background to bankroll our bootstrapped effort to create a full marketing automation platform without outside investors.
And it worked.
That said, we were always aware of the debt we owed to the StudioPress line of business, and more importantly, the community that had grown around the Genesis Framework. Which is to say, we always planned to come back to it and give it the love it deserved.
The idea for StudioPress Sites dates back to 2014. I wanted to do a “Squarespace for WordPress” that had the ease of an all-in-one website builder combined with the flexible power of WordPress.
In the spring of 2016, Tony Clark decided to run with the project. It began by having candid conversations with our StudioPress customers, and prominent people in the WordPress community.
These conversations revealed that not only did people agree with the need for this solution …
… they demanded it.
An innovative hybrid solution
Delivering another website builder wouldn’t be that tough (we knew how to do it thanks to Rainmaker). But that was only half the equation, which made it a bit trickier.
How do you incorporate the best aspects of a website builder like Squarespace or Wix, without locking people into an inflexible box that doesn’t benefit from the best parts of WordPress?
In other words, we needed

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