How the Bestselling Author of ‘The Blue Zones’ Dan Buettner Writes

The multiple New York Times bestselling author of The Blue Zones books and National Geographic Fellow, Dan Buettner, dropped by the show to talk about his world travels, life-saving longevity research, and some fantastic advice for writers.
The author is an internationally recognized explorer who discovered five places in the world — called Blue Zones — where humans live the longest and healthiest, and his 2005 National Geographic cover story “The Secrets of Living Longer” was a finalist for a National Magazine Award.
Based on his Blue Zones work, Dan founded a company of the same name to share “the world’s best practices in longevity and well-being” and has helped to successfully raise life expectancy in American cities including both Minnesota and Los Angeles.
Mr. Buettner has been featured on Real Time with Bill Maher, CNN, the Late Show with David Letterman, Good Morning America, and the TODAY Show to discuss his research.
His TED talk “How to live to be 100+” has been viewed almost 2.9 million times, and he has given more than 500 keynote speeches over the last 10 years.
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In this file Dan Buettner and I discuss:

Wise words from the author’s mentor George Plimpton
Why good stories are the Trojan Horse to winning over readers
How a decade of research and writing became a life-saving blueprint for American cities
The coffee-shop effect for productive writing
One great trick for beating writer’s block
Why building your

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Just Because You Can, Doesn’t Mean You Should (Plus Other Life Lessons from Seth Spears)

This week’s guest specializes in helping small business owners and bloggers take their businesses to the next level. He wants to assist others in creating a strategy for long-term success. He is Seth Spears, and he is a Digital Entrepreneur.
In this 34-minute episode, Seth walks you through his journey as a digital entrepreneur:

How Seth used just-in-time learning and a strong work ethic to go from “miserable” to pursuing his life dreams
His advice on just because you can do something, doesn’t mean that you should
Why being a self-learner has helped him accomplish what he’s set out to do
The importance of focusing on what you’re good at (and where there is demand)

And more.
Plus, Seth answers my rapid-fire questions at the end. He reveals the productivity hack that you can implement into your routine to get more meaningful work done.
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Tim Ferriss on Finding and Focusing On What Truly Matters

Tim Ferris broke into popular consciousness nine years ago with the release of The 4-Hour Workweek. He’s gone on to create a series of books based on the “4-Hour” concept.
That’s in addition to a wildly popular blog, podcast, and even a TV show. But in economic terms, all of that pales in comparison to Tim’s success as an angel investor; he’s scored early positions in Uber, Twitter, Evernote, Shopify, and Facebook.
So, it was somewhat of a shock to hear that Tim is stepping away from new investments. And you’ll be more than a bit surprised to hear what he’s focusing on next, and more importantly … why.
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Should You Still Start a Podcast? (Ask Yourself These 3 Questions)

As Showrunners, we understand that the act of creation and publishing brings about detractors — sometimes more aptly referred to as haters.
To thrive in this space, we need to wear our first (and subsequent) negative reviews as badges of honor. This is part of the game and an integral part of being a Showrunner.
But what happens when the medium itself begins to make its own waves? It seems podcasting, as a medium, has reached a point in its life when it is beginning to take it on the chin.
From small jokes to snide remarks, we are seeing the first wave of this beginning.
On this week’s episode, Jerod and Jonny discuss one of the more recent and more popular articles aimed at today’s Showrunner.
Immediately following a whirlwind book promotion of 40+ podcast interviews, author Ryan Holiday took some downtime to deride the very medium he used to drive book sales.
Ryan’s article titled Please, Please, For The Love of God: Do Not Start a Podcast, is the topic of discussion in this week’s episode — and it’s a fun one.
Luckily for everyone involved, Jerod and Jonny go beyond Ryan’s article and discuss the three questions you need to answer to decide for yourself if you should start a podcast:

Do you have a desire to connect with an audience about a topic that is important to you?
Will the content you share educate, entertain, or inspire the people in your audience?
Can you commit to creating

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Gary Vaynerchuk on Playing the Long Game

Back in 2006, Gary Vaynerchuk started a daily video show that turned wine criticism on its head. More importantly, it took his family wine business from $3 million-a-year to a $60 million-a-year ecommerce juggernaut.
From there, Gary did something that surprised a lot of people, including me. He started a digital marketing agency called VaynerMedia.
Wait … what? Why would someone who could move that level of product want to build a service business? Isn’t that going backwards?
Not so fast. As you’ll hear in this candid interview, Gary’s plan involves what has now become familiar to Unemployable listeners — doing this thing now in order to set the stage for bigger and better things down the road.
In other words, true entrepreneurs are always playing the long game. Listen in for amazing insights from one of the most outspoken advocates for the unemployable.
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How Becoming a Digital Entrepreneur Helped Jarmar Dupas Get His Life Right

This week’s guest aspires to help you get your money right. He wants to assist others in taking back their purchasing power. He is Jarmar Dupas, and he is a Digital Entrepreneur.
In this 35-minute episode, Jarmar walks you through his journey as a digital entrepreneur:

The moment that got his ears “buzzing,” which got him interested in entrepreneurship
The simplicity of his proudest moment … and what you can learn from it
How being a digital entrepreneur has been conducive to creating his desired lifestyle
Why Jarmar sometimes gets in his own way and how he’s trying to overcome it
The element of entrepreneurship that gives him the most satisfaction and how it inspires him to keep moving forward

And more.
Plus, Jarmar answers my rapid-fire questions at the end in which he retells a famous Stephen Covey story that has impacted his ability to get more meaningful work done.
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Brian Clark on The 7-Figure CEO Podcast

On this episode of Elsewhere, Brian Clark and Casey Graham of The 7-Figure CEO Podcast chat about Brian’s entrepreneurial journey that led him to building a software technology company that brings in more than $12 million in annual revenue.
In this 43-minute episode, Brian and Casey discuss:

Brian’s life-changing decision to quit his law career
The beginning of the Copyblogger blog
The business of content marketing before it was a business
Transitioning from Copyblogger to Rainmaker Digital

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How the Author of ‘The Bestseller Code’ Jodie Archer Writes: Part Two

Literary scholar, publishing consultant, and co-author of the critically acclaimed book The Bestseller Code, Jodie Archer dropped by to chat with me about her journey, the coming revolution in publishing, and the insecurities that all writers face.
Before earning her PhD from Stanford, Ms. Archer studied English at Cambridge, worked in both journalism and TV, and became an acquisitions editor for Penguin UK publishing.
While at Stanford, Jodie taught nonfiction and memoir writing, and researched both contemporary fiction and bestsellers. Upon completion of her doctoral work, she was recruited by Apple, where she was the lead in research on books.
Her book, The Bestseller Code, is based on her doctoral research with professor Matt Jockers on an algorithm that they tested over four years and refined by text mining more than 20,000 contemporary novels.
The Guardian proclaimed that their book “… may revolutionize the publishing industry,” in part because their algorithm was able to predict bestselling books 80 percent of the time, based on a theme, plot, character, and many other big data points.
If you’re a fan of The Writer Files, please click subscribe to automatically see new interviews.
If you missed the first half you can find it right here.
In Part Two of this file Jodie Archer and I discuss:

How to use Google Docs to co-write a book
Why every writer is organized in their own disorganized way
How to get into your creativity zone
The worst question you can ask a book lover
Why authenticity is critical for your productivity

Listen to

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Why Trusting Your Instincts Can Lead You to Your Passion

This week’s guest is obsessed. She has a burning passion for creating freedom not only in her own life but also in the lives of others. She is Raubi Perilli, and she is a Digital Entrepreneur.
In this 32-minute episode, Raubi walks you through her story as a digital entrepreneur:

Why she learned to trust her instincts after a particularly challenging experience with a client
How she was able to find a balance between client work and creating digital products
Why seeing clients excited to receive the work they’ve paid her for gives her the most satisfaction in her business
How Raubi plans to keep changing and growing moving forward
The simple, but powerful, productivity hack that has helped Raubi focus on work that matters (and that you could implement today)

And more. Plus, Raubi answers my rapid-fire questions at the end, where she reveals who she’d have a 30-minute Skype call with if given the chance.
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How to Start and Grow a Successful Membership Site (In Your Spare Time)

Starting a membership site is hard work, especially if you have a full-time job. But with persistence and patience, it can pay off.
Our guest, Jerod Morris, shares his tactics and advice for growing a membership site. It was not easy — especially since his membership site competes with numerous online sport sites.
But he found his niche and kept working it, season after season, finding success after many years of perseverance.
And while his story is not unique, the ideas and tactics he shares on this show are priceless and can truly help you grow, and profit, from your work.
In this episode, Jessica Frick and I interview Jerod Morris and delve into the history of his site, including:

Why he stayed with the project even when his audience was small
The unique insight that helped distinguish his site from the competition
The one tactic he recommends everyone starting a membership site should use
And the different revenue paths he pursues to grow his profit

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