A Desert Island Paradise … and a Great Podcasting Course

On Monday, Stefanie Flaxman showed off an incredibly easy (no, really) way to boost the power of your content, make it more audience-friendly, and even enhance your SEO. On Tuesday, things got a little silly when we asked our editorial team what their “desert island” copywriting technique would be. Come check them out — with Read More…
The post A Desert Island Paradise … and a Great Podcasting Course appeared first on Copyblogger.

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The Showrunner Podcasting Course Is Open (For a Limited Time)

Yes, the course is open (temporarily). Yes, I want you to join our community. Yes, podcasting is an excellent marketing channel. But first, we need to answer the question burning inside your brain … Who is The Showrunner Podcasting Course for? Now, I’m going to be one of those guys and answer your question with Read More…
The post The Showrunner Podcasting Course Is Open (For a Limited Time) appeared first on Copyblogger.

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The Bold and the Stressful: Smart Ways to Make a Big Move

Sometimes, you just have to muster your courage and do something Big. It might mean making a brave statement with your content, or creating a splash by launching something new and amazing. On Monday, Brian Clark shared a strategy for telling a more gripping story by using the framing power of contrast. And he showed Read More…
The post The Bold and the Stressful: Smart Ways to Make a Big Move appeared first on Copyblogger.

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Why I Love Broadcasting My Podcast Recordings Live

Seven years ago, I recorded my first live podcast. The process was remarkably simple, even then: my co-hosts and I called into BlogTalkRadio on our phones and we provided postgame commentary for a basketball game that had just ended. I’m pretty sure the three of us outnumbered listeners for that first show. So the stakes Read More…
The post Why I Love Broadcasting My Podcast Recordings Live appeared first on Copyblogger.

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Expand Your Content Marketing Toolkit

On Monday, our friend Jon Nastor shared the top tips he’s learned from conducting more than 350 podcast interviews in two years. He has a lot of solid advice here on how to better prepare for your interviews — without making your content stiff or robotic.
On Tuesday, our editorial assistant Will DeWitt revealed how his experiences on a recent cruise shaped how he thinks about customer experience — and how you can structure your content to make your audience feel like treasured guests.
And on Wednesday, Stefanie Flaxman saved us from the humiliation of 12 different word choice errors. Because content marketing is just more fun when you’re not embarrassing yourself in public.
On the Copyblogger FM podcast this week, I talked about how to attract the specific audience you want to your business, podcast, or blog. Everything you do will get much easier when you know you’re talking to the right folks.
And on our brand-new Sites podcast, Jerod Morris covered easy ways you can use excellent design to forge a stronger connection with your audience. (By the way, Jerod mentions a free coupon you might want to pick up if you’re looking for better hosting — it expires tomorrow, on July 14, so you’ll want to hop to it.)
That’s it for this week — have a great weekend, and we’ll see you Monday.
— Sonia Simone
Chief Content Officer, Rainmaker Digital

Catch up on this week’s content

How to Conduct Not-to-Miss Podcast Interviews
by Jon Nastor

3 Ways the ‘Cruise

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How to Conduct Not-to-Miss Podcast Interviews

When I started Hack the Entrepreneur, I had never conducted a single interview before.
But during the past two years, I’ve hosted more than 350 podcast interviews. I’ve also made a lot of mistakes, embarrassed myself a few times, and learned countless lessons.
So now I have a number of insights to share with you today, as well as tips to avoid some not-so-obvious blunders.
Want to learn a simple path that builds an audience of dedicated listeners? A path that eases the burden of content creation, puts you at the forefront of your brand, and harnesses the power of experts and their audiences?
Although interview-based podcasts may seem like casual conversations, becoming a great interviewer takes practice.
Let’s start at the beginning.
The work required to conduct a not-to-miss conversation starts before you sit down for an interview …
Do the work, then let it go
The foundation of any good interview is knowing your guest and the topic you’re discussing. Podcast hosts need to treat interviews with extra care, especially when they’re performed remotely.
Your job is to quickly and effectively warm up your guest, engage them, and remove any barriers holding them back from sharing compelling details of their story.
Researching your guest before the interview helps you empathize with them. Your research can be as thorough or basic as you want it to be, depending on what you’re trying to accomplish with the interview.
Your research should give you everything you need to ask good questions.
The familiarity you will

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The Path to Freedom, More Creativity, and … Really Good Audio Quality

We kicked off the holiday week on Monday with your July creativity and productivity prompts.
Each month this year, we’re suggesting practical ideas to improve your content and help you get more done. In July, we’re challenging you to select two content types that are new to you and schedule an extra hour each day to work on something meaningful.
(If one of your new content types is audio, be sure to check out Wednesday’s post this week as well.)
Tuesday was U.S. Independence Day, and I shared my latest thoughts on three steps toward greater economic and time independence: growing your audience, creating a revenue stream, and committing to growth and learning.
Each of those three is a big topic, which is why it’s our privilege to help you with them throughout the year.
On Wednesday, Toby Lyles, who was instrumental to the development of our Rainmaker FM podcast network, gave some of his best tips on how to get that smooth pro sound from your audio — without killing your budget.
Toby has given me some fantastic tips for improving my own recordings over the years, and I’m so glad we convinced him to write a post for us!
That’s it for this week — have a great weekend, and we’ll see you Monday.
— Sonia Simone
Chief Content Officer, Rainmaker Digital

Catch up on this week’s content

2017 Content Excellence Challenge: The July Prompts
by Sonia Simone

How to Carve Out Your Own Slice of Independence
by Sonia Simone

10 Easy Tips

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10 Easy Tips for Professional Audio Quality

I started working with podcasts because I was an avid podcast listener.
I would be listening to a conversation, hanging on every word, and then it would happen: the guest would bump his mic at the exact moment when he said the one thing I wanted to hear, and I’d miss out.
Our content should connect and engage, not frustrate and push away.
Since I run a podcast production company, I’ve learned that most people think any sound problem can be repaired with the simple twist of a knob. If only that were so.
Do you know how to avoid the most common podcast production pitfalls that distract your listeners?
Read on to discover how your podcast can stand out from the majority of the audio content available on the web.
Quality audio defined
Audio quality can be as subjective as Picasso’s art in a museum. One person says it’s brilliant … the next walks away scratching their head.
Let’s start with what quality audio is not.
You can tell audio needs to be improved when you hear:

Hum
Buzz
Hiss
Room reflections (echoes from the recording room)
Microphone handling, bumping sounds
Other foreign sounds: animals, lawnmowers, keyboard clicks, etc.
“Plosives” (the explosive sound consonants make when spoken into a microphone)
Extreme audio processing (audio effects that create an unnatural sound)

On the other hand, quality audio can be defined in one word: natural.
Quality audio sounds as if you’re talking around a kitchen table or with a client in your office. Your sound should be a

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Practical Tips to Move You Toward Your Content Marketing Goals

This week is all about good, old-fashioned pragmatism. It’s about the specific tactics you can use to start getting the results you’re looking for — sooner rather than later.
On Monday, Stefanie Flaxman gave us some suggestions on timing when you want to approach that busy influencer with your killer idea or humble request.
On Tuesday, Jerod Morris let us know about the launch of Sites, a new podcast that helps you build the website you need to reach your goals.
And on Wednesday, I outlined specific steps you can take to gain momentum when no one knows who you are (yet). Your “1,000 True Fans” aren’t going to show up overnight, but there is a path you can take to get to them.
Over on Copyblogger FM, I talked about the “killer and the poet” — and what to do if you need a little boost in one of those two roles.
And … did we mention the new Sites podcast? I’m rather partial to the one that Jerod recorded based on my Digital Sharecropping post.
We have four episodes for you at this launch. Each episode of Sites focuses on one of the four pillars of a successful website: content, design, technology, and strategy. The episodes are punchy and focused, and will get you right to the information you need.
That’s it for this week — have a great weekend, and we’ll see you Monday.
— Sonia Simone
Chief Content Officer, Rainmaker Digital

Catch up on this week’s content

When

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How to Build a Better WordPress Website … One Week at a Time

What is the key to building a better website?
Well, you first need an idea. And it needs to be useful.
Next, you need to start with the right stuff, the right raw materials. You clicked on the headline of this post, so perhaps you’re already using WordPress or strongly considering it. Good choice. Continue down that path.
After that, you have to be willing to hit Publish. Whether you’re starting your own food blog, marketing your copywriting business, or building an audience for your coaching services … you have to put your story out there on the web for all to see. That can be scary. It’s also empowering.
What comes next?
Find a path for continuous improvement
A few years ago, I wrote an article on Copyblogger titled How to Immediately Become a More Productive (and Better) Writer. A book I had just read called One Small Step Can Change Your Life by Robert Maurer inspired that post.
The book takes its cue from the Japanese concept of kaizen, which means continuous improvement — or, to be more specific, the process of achieving sustained success through small, steady steps.
This concept spoke to me then. It continues to speak to me now.
It’s so easy, especially in today’s environment of ubiquitous distraction, to get lost in big ideas and forget about the inevitable series of small steps it takes to achieve them.
I am easily prone to this. I’ve learned this about myself. I have to be intentional about pulling myself

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