How to Learn From Your Mistakes

Everybody makes mistakes.
And everybody should make mistakes. They are unavoidable when we step outside of our comfort zones. Avoiding mistakes means avoiding growth.
But we can’t repeat our mistakes. We need to learn from them. When we do, we turn negatives into positives and move forward. When we don’t, we simply run in place.
In this episode of The Lede, Demian and I share personal stories of mistakes we’ve made — some big and some small — and how we learned from them, and we describe the thought process necessary to do so consistently.
We discuss:

Recovering from technical errors (notably, a rather embarrassing one Jerod made recently)
Walking away from security in pursuit of happiness
Self-compassion in the face of mistakes
Why it’s okay to want recognition for your hard work
How to mobilize into action quickly when things go wrong
Letting go of stubbornness in favor of learning

Listen to The Lede …
To listen, you can either hit the flash audio player below, or browse the links to find your preferred format …

Click here to download the mp3 | 43.0 MB | 31:07
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React to The Lede …
As always, we appreciate your reaction to episodes of The Lede and feedback about how we’re doing.
Send us a tweet with your thoughts anytime: @JerodMorris and @DemianFarnworth.
And please tell us the most important point you took away from this episode. Do so by joining

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Trolls, Unkind Words, and How to Know You’re on the Right Track

At the end of the day, I just find your persona incredibly grating.
Funny that I can still remember that comment word-for-word. It’s from an unsubscribe note to my email list dating back at least seven years now.
I heard lots of good things back then, too. I was helping people, sharing what I knew in a way that was useful to my (then tiny) audience. But I don’t remember any of the good comments verbatim.
Even back then, though, the note made me laugh.
(Ruefully.)
Because I knew that it was a signpost. A signal that I was headed in the right direction.
The Internet is full of wonderful things. It’s given me a rich business life, a vehicle to help and teach, lots of friendships, and a wide view of this amazing world. I even met my husband online.
But it’s also populated by a few people who are rude and disagreeable, if not outright trolls.
The day you get your first snotty comment is the day you’ve arrived, in a weird way. It means you’ve escaped your own echo chamber. You’ve grown out of the little cocoon that kept you safe.
And you’re strong enough to handle that, even if you don’t always feel that way.
No one takes a swipe at boring people
If you’re a bland, unremarkable serving of Cream of Wheat, you won’t attract many haters.
You need a strong voice to stand out online — and some will find that “incredibly grating.” You’re on the

Original Source

Why Creating Your First Blockbuster Online Product Is Easier Than You Think

Imagine you’ve just launched your first product.
It’s a short little course, just a few weeks long, that teaches the “DIY” version of the topics you help people with every day. You built it once, delivered it online, and now it works for you while you’re off doing other activities you love.
This online course has been a transformative force in your life.
You’ve found financial freedom, because you’re no longer constrained by the economics of trading time for money. And you’ve multiplied your impact, making the world a better place for dozens, hundreds, or even thousands of people.
It’s a pretty picture, isn’t it?
But you and I both know it isn’t so easy to achieve.
In reality, most people with big dreams of product creation end up spending months, or even years, investing time and money that they can’t afford to lose into a project that will probably never see the light of day.
It’s a sad reality, but the good news is that it doesn’t have to be this way.
Let your audience direct your product development …
What the creators of most blockbuster products have figured out is how to completely avoid that situation by allowing their audiences to guide product development.
This is one of the areas where Copyblogger has always excelled. They first discussed the concept of a minimum viable audience back in 2012:
Build an audience through content marketing. Let them tell you what they want. Build products and offer services based on their desires and needs. Prosper.
By

Original Source

Announcing The 2015 Cost of Online Business Report [Infographic]

Here’s a neat fact to start your day: Copyblogger has a goat keeper among its readers. We know because he took our 2015 Cost of Online Business survey.
Now, more than likely it’s a prank. A prank by some misfit in Boca Raton.
But I have to confess: part of me wants there to be a goat keeper (somewhere exotic) who is a faithful reader of Copyblogger. An enterprising shepherd who dreams of growing his herd — with content marketing.
Ah, to dream.
But whether or not the goat keeper is real doesn’t really matter. It is, however, just one of dozens of interesting discoveries we made during our 2015 Cost of Online Business survey.
Discoveries like:

More than a quarter of respondents identified as a Small Business Owner.
Most website owners are struggling to make a living online.
Yet more and more people are choosing to enter the online business realm.
Generating traffic is the biggest challenge of running an online business.

And 53 additional interesting results.
Results that will help us create content that solves your online business problems and develop new products that better serve your needs. Not to mention allowing us to upgrade our current products based on what matters most to you.
Naturally, we wanted this information to serve you better. But we thought you needed it, too.
How can you accurately evaluate your current strategies and tactics — and their associated costs — if you don’t know what other folks are doing and what’s working for them?
You need to know your options.
The survey results in three ways
We’ve decided to provide the results

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