3 Proofreading Pointers, So Your Writing Isn’t Shared for the Wrong Reason

Whenever someone questions the importance of proofreading, my go-to response is:
“Pubic relations is quite different from public relations.”
We all sometimes make a typo that omits or changes a letter in a word. A typo like that is difficult to spot when the mistake is still an actual word (or words). Just last week, I wrote “head lice” instead of “headline.” Again, two completely different things.
But I have an effective proofreading process that helps me find and correct errors before they are published. (Except, of course, when the error is a joke.)
Do you want to know techniques I use on my own writing as well as every article we publish on Copyblogger?
Walk the line
I’ve witnessed two different attitudes when it comes to how people feel about typos.
Some find them unacceptable and a reason to stop reading a publication. Others aren’t bothered by them at all and don’t understand why anyone would make an effort to prevent them.
I’m sure you’re not surprised that my outlook falls in the middle between those two extremes. I walk the line.
It’s a bit excessive to call a website “untrustworthy” if there is a typo in a piece of content or if an author doesn’t strictly follow grammar rules, but publishing your writing with a number of mistakes isn’t wise either. It can even lead to customer service headaches.
Established publications might be able to “get away with” occasional typos. Their audiences (for the most part) will be forgiving.
But if your

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How to Optimize Content for Both Search and Social (Plus, a Headline Hack that Strikes the Balance)

It’s as if they live in different countries: Searchlandia and Socialstan.
Search optimizers and social media marketers don’t get together a whole lot, at least not in the same piece of content. But there’s no reason they can’t peacefully coexist in one article, in one URL.
Imagine. One topic, one message, united in quality, but with two separate and equally powerful sources of traffic: search and social.
Is it possible? Can one post be optimized for both?
Yes. And when it happens, the traffic is greater than the sum of its channels.
Um. Actually, the traffic is equal to the sum of its channels. But we’re not here to do math. We’re here to create the right type of content that gets traction everywhere.
Optimizing for search
Let’s start with a rundown of search optimization.
Our goal here is to indicate relevance, not trick a robot.
After you’ve identified a target keyword phrase:
Use the phrase in highly visible places
Those places are the title, header, meta description, and body text (of course). Yes, the tiny, barely visible places are nice too — such as alt text and the file names of images — but they’re not as important as those primary spots.
If this isn’t obvious, just ask yourself:
If you were building a new search engine today, would an image file name be a major search-ranking factor?
Probably not.
Include words and phrases semantically connected to your phrase
You see words and phrases semantically connected to your phrase everywhere when

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